1:26 The Art of Epilepsy Postscript

Hidden Truths Project’s 1:26 The Art of Epilepsy celebrated its 6th Annual art exhibit and fundraiser on September 16th at InVision in Newport Beach, California before a crowd of over 125 guests.  The Kant Institute was honored to recognize CURE (Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy), the leading nongovernmental funder of epilepsy research in the United States, as the event beneficiary. CURE is dedicated to raising public awareness, funding cutting edge research and through its advocacy efforts, raising federal expenditures in epilepsy research.  CURE has a four-star (highest) rating on Charity Navigator with more than 90% of its budget going directly into grants to fund epilepsy research. The evening raised over $51,000 in support of CURE.

Dr. Julie Thompson-Dobkin, CEO of the Kant Institute and Chair of the event shared a few words on 1:26 The Art of Epilepsy.

“Hidden Truths Project has continued its outreach locally, as well as on a global scale.  Over the past six years, our reach has expanded throughout the U.S., and into Mexico, Jamaica, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Sweden, India, Malaysia, Canada, and the Philippines.  The Project has over 260 artists, who live with epilepsy or are caregivers for these who do.  Art has become their voice to share the realities of their lives with epilepsy. For these individuals, art has opened a door for them to become part of a larger community in the fight to overcome the discrimination, stigma, and bias surrounding epilepsy, and to educate the general populace about the truths of this condition.

In a recent letter to President Trump, the Committee on the Arts & the Humanities stated, “Art is about inclusion.”  1:26 represents this inclusivity of the arts by celebrating a culturally diverse group of artists, spanning the globe, sharing a common voice. Art crosses all borders; it becomes a bridge to unite people of all races, cultures, and socio-economic backgrounds.  It intrinsically connects humans on an emotional as well as intellectual level.  

The 1:26 exhibition was filled with an eclectic mix of art, which revealed the good, the bad, the triumphs and the tragedies of living with epilepsy. For some of the artists their work brings order to their chaos. For others, the creation of art fosters a sense of predictability and control in their lives, something these individuals fight to achieve. For others it is their story of overcoming obstacles and rising above!

This is reflected in the words of two of the participating artists.”  

“Seizures often cause one to be filled with fear, loneliness, solitude, depression and mostly humiliation, which most people cannot understand.  The painting shows how a person living with epilepsy still can have hope for the future and the dream of being out of the darkness and accepted by others.”  R.D.

“I committed to produce a daily self-portrait using any medium for one year. I collated all of the images onto a video loop documenting the whole year. However, something so revealing happened about a month into the project. I noticed that the daily images I produced started to tell a story of my journey with living with epilepsy.”  A.S.  

The Kant Institute: Hidden Truths Project, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE), in collaboration with Fodada are proud sponsors of The Art of Epilepsy Project.  This project is part of an ongoing campaign in TKI’s mission to demystify epilepsy, to educate the general populace the truths of this condition, and support epilepsy research.  Through your purchase of clothing, that features the art of Katy Maehl displayed at 1:26 The Art of Epilepsy, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to CURE’s funding of epilepsy research in their mission to find a cure for epilepsy and realize the ultimate goal of “no seizures & no side-effects”.  This work is possible through the generous support of a caring community. Thank you, for becoming an important member of that community!

 

Artists credit: Dr. Amparo Ponce-Arango, Richard Davis, Angie Stimson